Our office remains open at this time. Consultations are available via telephone. The safety of our clients and employees is of the utmost importance.

Defending And Empowering The Disabled

What work history requirements apply for a SSD claim?

| Dec 23, 2014 | Social Security Disability, Social Security Disability

Many Georgia residents have went through the process of applying for new jobs and demonstrating that they have the work experience necessary to be hired. In some respects, the process of applying for Social Security disability benefits is similar, in that part of the process is centered on demonstrating a person’s work history before their recent inability to work.

Typically, there are two different tests that apply for someone who is applying for disability benefits. The first test looks at a person’s recent work history, along with their age. For example, if a person gets injured before their 24th birthday, the person must typically show they worked for one and a half years during the three-year period before their disability began. These numbers vary for individuals older than 24. For instance, a person over 31 years of age must show he or she worked for five of the ten years before his or her disability began.

A second test looks at a slightly different question, dealing with how long a person worked before the disability began. Once again, the duration of work needed varies, depending on a person’s age at the time of the disability. For example, a person who is 50 years old typically must show he or she worked for seven years in order to meet the duration of work test, while a person who is 60 years old must show nine and-a-half years of work.

Accordingly, the process of applying for disability benefits is individualized. In other words, what one person must show to obtain disability benefits is not necessarily what another person must show. Therefore, each individual should understand what requirements apply for their particular situation.

Source: Social Security Administration, “Disability Benefits,” accessed on Dec. 19, 2014

Archives

FindLaw Network