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How could back pain affect an Atlanta resident’s ability to work?

| Apr 7, 2017 | Uncategorized

Back injuries are fairly commonplace and can be very incapacitating for workers in Atlanta. Many people find that their ability to work is severely compromised by a back injury. Often, a back injury will manifest itself as severe back pain. This blog post will provide a little bit of information on back pain. Individuals suffering back pain should visit a doctor for diagnosis and treatment.

Back pain is obviously a pain that affects a person’s back. Sometimes the pain will be a stabbing or shooting pain. Other times it will be a muscle ache. A pain that radiates down the leg or pain causing limited range of back motion or limited flexibility are other manifestations of back pain.

There are cases where a sufferer of back pain should seek immediate medical attention. These include cases where back pain happens after a fall and cases where the pain causes sudden bowel or bladder problems. One should also seek medical attention as soon as possible if back pain is accompanied by a fever. Other times, through self-care and home treatment, back pain may resolve itself within two weeks. If the back pain does not improve with rest or is severe, if pain or tingling spreads to the legs, or if back pain is accompanied by unexplained weight loss, a doctor’s appointment should be scheduled.

Although back pain often goes away with treatment, what if it doesn’t? What if back pain is so severe that a sufferer is not able to work? Depending on the patient’s prognosis, it may be possible to receive Social Security disability benefits for injuries. This is heavily dependent on the specific circumstances of the case, and a Social Security benefits attorney can be a good resource for those with questions.

Source: Mayo Clinic, “Back pain: Symptoms,” accessed on April 2, 2017

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