Once the Social Security Administration, or SSA, has reviewed your application for disability benefits, a decision will be made as to whether to award you Social Security Disability benefits. If your application is denied, you and your attorney can go through the appeals process to hopefully change the SSA’s decision. However, it is important to note that even if you have been granted benefits, you will have to take certain steps to ensure that you continue to receive benefits for as long as you need them.

If you have been granted benefits, you will typically receive your benefits electronically on a monthly basis. As a Social Security disability recipient, you are required to let the SSA know if your medical condition improves or if your ability to work changes. You must also inform the SSA if you go back to work. You should notify the SSA via phone, mail, or in person as soon as possible.

Failure to report these changes could stop your benefits altogether. If you fail to report changes, and are overpaid as a result, you will have to repay the extra money. Finally, any attempt to intentionally provide the SSA with false information will count as a violation. Your benefits will be stopped for six months for your first violation, one year for your second violation, and two years for your third violation.

You will also need to prepare for your continuing disability review, which will occur every few months or few years depending on whether your condition is likely to improve. When you receive a letter from the SSA telling you that it’s time for your review, you will need to provide an SSA representative information about any medical treatments you have undergone since receiving benefits, as well as any work you may have done.

There is a lot you need to do to maintain your SSD benefits. A disability attorney can help make sure that you provide the SSA with all the information necessary to keep your benefits.