RH&K - Rogers, Hofrichter & Karrh, LLC
770-884-6705
877-572-3949
Defending and
Empowering the Disabled
Over 20 years. 4000+ cases.
Experience matters.
Social Security Disability
Workers' Compensation

Long-Term Disability
Veterans Disability
Click Here for Site Topics

Atlanta Social Security Disability Law Blog

Do you qualify for multiple kinds of disability benefits?

When Georgia residents need financial assistance, the last thing they want to do is jump through obstacles and navigate through a confusing patchwork of legal regulations. And yet, it can often seem as though that is what is necessary when a person applies for Social Security disability benefits.

Take, for instance, the recent discussion on this blog regarding the interaction between different kinds of benefits. If a person receives disability benefits under certain state law programs, it can influence the person's ability to receive Social Security disability benefits. This can come as a surprise to some when they receive notice of a denied claim or when they receive notice that their benefits are not as high as they anticipated.

Applying for benefits for a work-related injury

Workplace injuries are unfortunately common. When the injuries are serious, Georgia residents may find themselves unable to do their jobs and may find themselves without the income they need to live their lives. Lost wages can severely impact individuals' abilities to pay their bills, care for their families, and meet their other financial obligations.

When people find themselves unable to work due to injuries sustained while doing their jobs, they may be able to apply for disability benefits from the government. The Social Security Administration offers injured workers the opportunity to apply for disability benefits to help them maintain their livelihood during their recovery period. The law firm of Rogers, Hofrichter & Karrh provides Social Security disability benefits legal services to people who are struggling with work-related injuries.

Can veterans with VA benefits qualify for SSD benefits?

This past Memorial Day, as with every year, many Georgia residents took the opportunity to reflect and remember the sacrifices from American veterans. In addition to remembering those sacrifices, Memorial Day provides a chance to think of what can be done to help living veterans, including those who have suffered injuries in service of their country.

A crucial part of helping veterans is ensuring that they have the financial stability they need, including disability benefits for those who are eligible. However, issues can arise between different kinds of disability benefits.

How much are SSD benefits affected by other benefits?

In the legal system, it can seem as though the simplest of issues can quickly turn into a complicated matter. This can occur when it comes to a person's ability to obtain Social Security disability benefits, as in any other area of law.

For example, recently this blog has discussed how Georgia residents' disability benefits can be impacted by other financial sources. Retirement benefits, workers' compensation benefits and other public disability payments all have the potential to affect the Social Security disability payments.

Are disability benefits affected by other types of benefits?

As discussed last week in this blog, individuals may have tough decisions to make when an illness or injury prevents them from continuing to work. While Georgia residents may qualify for Social Security disability benefits for illness, those benefits can be impacted by other financial sources like retirement benefits.

However, retirement benefits are not the only type of income that can impact a person's SSD benefits. If a person obtains workers' compensation benefits because of a job-related illness, for example, it can affect the SSD benefits.

Can a person file for retirement and disability at the same time?

When Georgia residents face important decisions in their lives, it always helps to have more options to consider. The choice of one option over another, or the choice of both at once, will depend on the circumstances at issue.

For example, when a person suffers a work-related injury near the age of retirement, there may be tough decisions to consider in how the person should handle the situation. Some individuals may choose to retire, while others may not be ready to retire yet, but they may be unable to work because of the injury.

Does your inability to work qualify you for SSD benefits?

Many Georgia residents find a great deal of meaning in their careers. Individuals may spend years, or even decades, building and investing in their career. Given the importance a career has to a person, it can be very disheartening when the person is no longer able to continue working due to an injury.

Of course, a person's inability to work can also present a serious financial hardship. Fortunately, the person may qualify for Social Security disability benefits, which can help offset the financial difficulties of dealing with a lost income.

What is the residual functional capacity?

For many Georgia residents, the legal system can be confusing and intimidating. This is understandable, as individuals typically have little in depth encounters with the legal system until they become personally involved in a case.

Even if someone has had some general experience in the legal system, the experience can vary widely depending on the type of case at issue. For example, the process of obtaining Social Security disability benefits is unique, even within the legal system.

What does a vocational expert do in a SSD case?

In the legal system, everyone has their own role to play. Each piece of evidence in a case, including testimony from different witnesses, all goes together to form one whole puzzle.

Recently, this blog discussed the different kinds of evidence that may be presented at a hearing when a Georgia resident is attempting to obtain Social Security disability benefits for injuries. While medical evidence about a person's inability to work is vital to the case, another important aspect may be testimony from a vocational expert.

What kind of evidence is considered at a SSD hearing?

As discussed last week in this blog, it is important for Georgia residents to have an opportunity to set things right after mistakes happen. This includes reversing an improper denial of Social Security disability benefits, which can involve multiple appeals to fix.

One crucial step in the appeals process is having a hearing before an administrative law judge. The hearing can be requested if the applicant for SSD benefits disagrees with the agency's decision to deny benefits.

Office Locations

Rogers, Hofrichter & Karrh, LLC

MAIN/MAILING
Rogers, Hofrichter & Karrh, LLC
225 South Glynn Street, Suite 1
Fayetteville, Georgia 30214

Phone: 770-884-6705
Toll Free: 877-572-3949
Fax: 770-460-1920

Email Us | Fayetteville Law Office Map

BRANCH OFFICE
2970 Clairmont Road NE, Suite 1010
Atlanta, GA 30329
Phone: 770-884-6705
Toll Free: 877-572-3949
Fax: 770-460-1920

Email Us | Get Directions

BRANCH OFFICE
5 South Public Square
Cartersville, GA 30120
Phone: 770-884-6705
Toll Free: 877-572-3949
Fax: 770-460-1920

Email Us | Get Directions

FindLaw Network
Professional Associations
NOSSCR Distinguished AV | LexisNexis Martindale-Hubbell | Peer Review Rated For Ethical Standards and Legal Ability Super Lawyers ASNP | academy of special needs planners

Privacy Policy | Business Development Solutions by FindLaw, a Thomson Reuters business.