Claims for Social Security Disability Insurance in Georgia and elsewhere have been on the rise for nearly two decades. This has put considerable pressure on the Social Security Disability Insurance program’s ability to deliver services and benefits to the claimants who need them. Moreover, it led to a rapid depletion of the funds earmarked to pay those benefits – funds withheld from workers’ wages by the federal government.

According to the New York Times, however, applications for SSDI have decreased sharply. This could have several positive effects on the program. First of all, the continued decline in applications could mean that the delays in claims processing and hearings that current claimants are experiencing could be greatly reduced. The drop off in applications has also caused the Social Security Administration to revise its estimates as to when the program will become insolvent.

Two years ago, the SSA estimated that the trust fund from which SSD benefits are paid would become insolvent in 2023. Last year, after the decline in benefits claims began in earnest, it revised the insolvency date to 2028. And this month, in its latest annual report, SSA estimates that the fund will remain solvent through 2032, thanks to a stronger economy that creates more opportunities for those with disabilities to work.

Anyone who has suffered an injury or illness that prevents them from working altogether or limits their ability to do so may qualify for SSD benefits. However, only about one-third of claimants actually ever receive such benefits. One way to improve the chances of succeeding and attempt to ensure that a claim is accurate and properly documented with medical evidence is to enlist the help an experienced SSDI attorney.