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Defending And Empowering The Disabled

Am I entitled to my deceased spouse’s Social Security benefits?

| Aug 9, 2018 | Social Security Disability, Social Security Disability

Losing your spouse can be one of the most difficult things you ever have to go through. In additional to the emotional devastation, many people in Georgia whose spouses have passed away find themselves struggling to support themselves and their families financially. According to the Social Security Administration, you may be entitled to survivor’s benefits based on your deceased spouse’s Social Security record, which may ease some of your financial burdens as you go through the grieving process.

Generally, to qualify for your survivor’s benefits, you must have been married for at least 10 years. However, there are exceptions. The SSA will determine whether to transfer your spouse’s disability payments to you by evaluating a number of factors.

First, you must be at least 60 years of age to receive survivor’s benefits, or at least 50 years of age if you are disabled. If you are caring for a deceased child under the age of 16, you can receive benefits no matter how old you are. If you have reached full retirement age, you may receive full benefits. People who have not reached full retirement age will receive a percentage of their spouse’s benefits, generally between 50 and 99 percent.

Remarriage can also impact your eligibility for benefits. If you remarry before age 60, or before age 50 if you are disabled, you will not receive survivor benefits during your marriage. Remarrying after age 60 (or 50 if disabled) generally does not affect your eligibility for survivor benefits.

Rules relating to Social Security disability can be hard to understand, particularly if you are grieving. Fortunately, with professional guidance, you can pursue the support you need during this difficult time.

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