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Defending And Empowering The Disabled

Key points about work activity and SSD benefits

| May 17, 2019 | Social Security Disability

Work activity is an important factor when Georgia residents are disabled and apply for Social Security disability insurance. The Social Security Administration and Disability Determination Services place a significant focus on a person’s ability to work when deciding whether they should be approved or denied Social Security disability.

Therefore, it is imperative for applicants to understand the federal regulations regarding work activity. Since this can be complicated and mistakes can result in the applicant not getting the benefits, having legal advice is always a sound decision.

The SSA will assess the work the person did. That includes experience, his or her skills, how much supervision they had, and what their responsibilities were. If the person was a significant contributor to a business and its operation, this generally indicates that the person could work at or above a level of substantial gainful activity (SGA). Simply doing the work is not all that is considered. The level at which the person completed the work and how well it was done is key. If the applicant shows the ability to do the work as needed and in a satisfactory manner, it could show that the SGA level has been reached. For a person who is doing a job that requires a minimum of effort and he or she is of limited or no use to the employer or to maintain a self-owned business, this will not indicate SGA.

Applying for SSD benefits is not a simple matter of filling out forms, applying and being approved. This is true even in cases that appear the most clear-cut. For those who have worked or are working, it is vital to understand how SGA is factored in. Having legal assistance from a law firm that specializes in cases related to SSDI benefits can be crucial to a case. Calling for a consultation is the first step when applying for disability.

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